factor

[fac┬Ětor]

A factor is a part or element that contributes to a result. If you only fly budget airlines and refuse to stay anywhere but youth hostels, then money is probably a big factor in your travel plans.

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One who transacts business for another; an agent; a substitute; especially, a mercantile agent who buys and sells goods and transacts business for others in commission; a commission merchant or consignee. He may be a home factor or a foreign factor. He may buy and sell in his own name, and he is intrusted with the possession and control of the goods; and in these respects he differs from a broker.

Noun
(genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"

Noun
an independent variable in statistics

Noun
an abstract part of something; "jealousy was a component of his character"; "two constituents of a musical composition are melody and harmony"; "the grammatical elements of a sentence"; "a key factor in her success"; "humor: an effective ingredient of a s

Noun
anything that contributes causally to a result; "a number of factors determined the outcome"

Noun
a businessman who buys or sells for another in exchange for a commission

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Noun
any of the numbers (or symbols) that form a product when multiplied together

Noun
one of two or more integers that can be exactly divided into another integer; "what are the 4 factors of 6?"

Verb
resolve into factors; "a quantum computer can factor the number 15"


n.
One who transacts business for another; an agent; a substitute; especially, a mercantile agent who buys and sells goods and transacts business for others in commission; a commission merchant or consignee. He may be a home factor or a foreign factor. He may buy and sell in his own name, and he is intrusted with the possession and control of the goods; and in these respects he differs from a broker.

n.
A steward or bailiff of an estate.

n.
One of the elements or quantities which, when multiplied together, from a product.

n.
One of the elements, circumstances, or influences which contribute to produce a result; a constituent.

v. t.
To resolve (a quantity) into its factors.


Factor

Fac"tor , n. [L. factor a doer: cf. F. facteur a factor. See Fact.] 1. (Law) One who transacts business for another; an agent; a substitute; especially, a mercantile agent who buys and sells goods and transacts business for others in commission; a commission merchant or consignee. He may be a home factor or a foreign factor. He may buy and sell in his own name, and he is intrusted with the possession and control of the goods; and in these respects he differs from a broker. Story. Wharton.
My factor sends me word, a merchant's fled That owes me for a hundred tun of wine.
2. A steward or bailiff of an estate. [Scot.] Sir W. Scott. 3. (Math.) One of the elements or quantities which, when multiplied together, from a product. 4. One of the elements, circumstances, or influences which contribute to produce a result; a constituent.
The materal and dynamical factors of nutrition.

Factor

Fac"tor, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Factored (-t?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Factoring.] (Mach.) To resolve (a quantity) into its factors.

One who transacts business for another; an agent; a substitute; especially, a mercantile agent who buys and sells goods and transacts business for others in commission; a commission merchant or consignee. He may be a home factor or a foreign factor. He may buy and sell in his own name, and he is intrusted with the possession and control of the goods; and in these respects he differs from a broker.

To resolve (a quantity) into its factors.

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Usage Examples

It is change, continuing change, inevitable change, that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be.

I say to my colleagues never confine your best work, your hopes, your dreams, the aspiration of the American people to what will be signed by George W. Bush because that is too limiting a factor.

By far the most important factor in the success or failure of any school, far more important than tests or standards or business-model methods of accountability, is simply attracting the best-educated, most exciting young people into urban schools and keeping them there.

Elegance is not a dispensable luxury but a factor that decides between success and failure.

Faith is the first factor in a life devoted to service. Without it, nothing is possible. With it, nothing is impossible.

Fitness will be a major factor in the first race and I think that will play into the hands of drivers who have been racing recently, rather than people like me who haven't raced properly for a decade. I'am not one of the favourites to start with.

Our philosophy precedes from the belief that sport is an inalienable part of the educational process and a factor for promoting peace, friendship, cooperation and understanding among peoples.

It's a very sobering feeling to be up in space and realize that one's safety factor was determined by the lowest bidder on a government contract.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

I believe that stress is a factor in any bad health.

If a race has no history, if it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated.

Another factor is the decision, made in 1976, to sharply divide the FBI and the foreign intelligence agencies. The FBI would collect within the United States the foreign intelligence agencies would collect overseas.

Character, in the long run, is the decisive factor in the life of an individual and of nations alike.

A State in the grip of neo-colonialism is not master of its own destiny. It is this factor which makes neo-colonialism such a serious threat to world peace.

It is the desire of the good people of the whole country that sectionalism as a factor in our politics should disappear...'

Another important historical factor is the fact that this already very simple religion was further simplified and purified by the early philosophers of ancient China. Our first great philosopher was a founder of naturalism and our second great philosopher was an agnostic.

Honesty is the most single most important factor having a direct bearing on the final success of an individual, corporation, or product.

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